Rising up against ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is not a single disease. There are more than 30 different types of malignancies, each with its own particular presentation and behaviors. However, most are identified within three major groups, depending upon the type of cells from which they were originated. Here is a list of the major types and sub-types.

Epithelial Tumors

90% of all ovarian cancer is epithelial in natu re, beginning in the surface (epithelial) lining of the ovaries.

Common Epithelial Tumors: Rare Epithelial Tumors:
Serous
Endometroid
Mucinous
Clear cell
Brenner
Undifferentiated
Transitional cell
Borderline

Germ Cell Tumors

These types of tumors form in the cells that produce the ova (eggs) and represent only about 5% of all ovarian cancers. They are most common in women in their 20s, and are highly curable.

Embryonal carcinoma
Immature teratoma
Polyembryoma
Dysgerminoma
Endodermal Sinus
Choriocarcinoma
Mixed germ cell

Stromal Tumors

These tumors represent approximately 5% of all ovarian cancer diagnoses. Formed from the cells of the sex cord, they are generally associated with a variety of hormonal effects.

Granulosa
Sertoli
Lipid cell
Granulosa theca cel
Sertoli-Leydig
Gynandroblastomas

Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

This variation of ovarian cancer can occur in women whose ovaries have been removed. It is closely related to Epithelial tumors.

Fallopian Tube Cancer

Fallopian tube cancer, also known as tubal cancer, develops in the fallopian tubes that connect the ovaries and the uterus. It is very rare and accounts for only 1 percen t to 2 percent of all gynecologic cancers.

For more information on the types and their prognosis, we suggest you visit
http://www.healthcommunities.com/ovarian-cancer/types.shtml

TERM DEFINITIONS